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Who is liable in a rideshare accident?

Uber, Lyft, Juno, Zimride—you name it—the ridesharing culture in Florida and across the nation is in full swing. A simple click on a smartphone app and you can hail a private ride in 10 minutes. The reliability of these rides without the need to exchange money is extremely popular among the young and old.

However, drivers operating ridesharing vehicles are not unlike other drivers on the road. Rear-end collisions happen. Accidents with large trucks occur.

But who is responsible when passengers are involved in a ridesharing auto accident? Here’s what you should know.

When your rideshare driver is at fault

Given the increase in popularity among rideshare services, more and more states today are passing laws that require rideshare drivers to carry certain auto insurance.

The state of Florida requires rideshare drivers to procure a policy that will cover at least $1 million in property damage, physical injuries and death. Many rideshare companies voluntarily cover their drivers with policies that go beyond state-required minimums.

In the event you are a passenger involved in a rideshare accident caused by your driver, you should be covered by that company’s carrier. However, as a safety precaution, you should never leave the scene before obtaining the contact information of all drivers and their insurance carriers. Making sure you know who to speak to in the event you need benefits is crucial.

 

 

Here’s what you need to know about who is liable when you have injuries from your ride in a rideshare vehicle.

Understanding the circumstances

In some ways, an accident in a rideshare vehicle is like any other car accident. Depending on what happened on the road, and who hit whom, you may be in a situation where the other driver is liable for your injuries.

As a rideshare passenger, it can be easy to get left out when the drivers are exchanging information after an accident. The insurance and contact information of both drivers and a copy of the police report will all be crucial when you make a claim. If possible, before you leave the scene, get the information of everyone involved.

When your driver is at fault

Now that more people are taking advantage of rideshare apps, more states are requiring rideshare drivers to carry additional insurance. Florida requires rideshare drivers to have a policy that will cover at least $1 million in property damage, physical injuries and death.

Many rideshare companies voluntarily cover their drivers with policies that go beyond state-required minimums. Depending on who was at fault for the accident, you may be able to recover damages from more than one party.

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