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Volvo releases distracted driving study

Florida residents who assume that it is only the younger generation who drives distracted may be interested in the results of a study conducted by Volvo and the Harris Poll. Thousands of participants were asked about the distracting activities they engage in behind the wheel. Just over 80 percent of millennials and Gen Xers admitted to phone use; this was followed by 71 percent of Generation Z, 64 percent of baby boomers and 59 percent of the Silent Generation.

Among specific activities, 60 percent admitted to texting and driving, 35 percent to reading emails, 25 percent to surfing the web and 20 percent to posting on social media. On the other hand, the participants clearly thought that other drivers were worse than they were — on average, they said that they believe more than 90 percent of other drivers text and read emails.

Just over 50 percent of those born between the mid-1990s and mid-2000s (Generation Z) feel that they are less capable of focusing on a single task than they were five years ago. Over half of all respondents feel the need to refocus and admit that they become anxious when they have too much to do. While 33 percent say that they try to refocus behind the wheel by driving in silence, 32 percent say they set their phones to “do not disturb.”

An accident victim who believes they have the grounds for a personal injury claim may want to hire a lawyer after they receive medical attention. If the other driver was using their phone at the time of the crash, the lawyer could bring in third-party experts to obtain the phone records and other pertinent evidence. The lawyer could then negotiate for a settlement covering past and future medical expenses, vehicle damage, lost wages and whatever else applies.

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